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City-wide Rezoning Impacts Property Rights in Raleigh, North Carolina

City-wide Rezoning Impacts Property Rights in Raleigh, North Carolina


(July 8, 2014)

A city-wide remapping effort is currently underway in Raleigh, North Carolina.  The City Council adopted a new Unified Development Ordinance last fall.  Several common zoning district classifications were eliminated from the code and the textual requirements of all surviving districts were substantially altered.  The City Zoning staff is now preparing a new zoning map for the entire jurisdiction to implement the  new Unified Development Ordinance.    All property in Raleigh will, in effect, be rezoned.  Comments and suggestions from property owners are being solicited by City Planners and will be compiled through this September, at which time public hearings before the elected officials will be scheduled.   Information regarding the process is available on the City website:  www.RaleighUDO.us.

If you own  or are otherwise invested in real property in Raleigh, it is important that you participate in and monitor this process.  Existing improvements could become zoning non-conformities due to altered building setback lines and/or height limitations, and parking and interconnectivity requirements for new developments may be changing. 

Smith Moore Leatherwood's real estate and land use attorneys are intimately familiar with the current UDO remapping effort. Please contact us if we may assist in you in evaluating the impact of the remapping on your property.

Authors
Clyde Holt
T (919) 755-8728
F (919) 838-3162
David J. Neill
T (919) 755-8766
F (919) 838-3168
David L. York
T (919) 755-8749
F (919) 838-3165
Associated Attorneys
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